Three Fringe Shows

Jul. 24th, 2017 04:56 pm
fauxklore: (Default)
[personal profile] fauxklore
I went to three Capital Fringe Festival shows over the weekend. (I had previously seen Mr. Taken.) Here’s the run-down, plus a note about the neighborhood.

NoMa: All three shows I saw this weekend were at Gallaudet University, which is at the edge of the NoMa (North of Massachusetts Avenue) area. Since I hadn’t been over that way before and had heard that it’s the hot and trendy neighborhoods, I took advantage of good metro connections to walk around a bit before the first show I went to. Unfortunately, a couple of friends saw me walking in the wrong direction (i.e. away from Gallaudet) and called me, panicked that I was horribly lost. Now, to be fair, I do spend a good percentage of my time horribly lost, but I probably should have answered the phone and reassured them.

The highlight of the area is allegedly Union Market, which is pretty much hipster central. I wasn’t all that impressed with it, though it did provide good ice cream. There is a promising looking coffee place there. There are also some charming row houses along M Street Northeast. And the newish REI in the Uline Arena, which was the site of the first concert The Beatles played in the United States. Still, there isn’t really a lot to draw me into the neighborhood.


Ready to Serve: Ellouise Schoettler’s story is about a group of nurses from Johns Hopkins who volunteered to serve in France during World War I. Her research was extensive, based largely on letters from the nurses themselves. There was no shortage of drama, with descriptions of the nurses having to wear every bit of clothing they had to cope with the cold and mud, as well as patients with horrifying injuries that they could do little for. It’s important to tell the stories of women’s history and Ellouise does this splendidly.


Constructive Fictions: This play tells the story of Rabbi Barry Freundel, who is serving a 6 and a half year prison term after pleading guilty to peeping on and filming women in the bathroom of the mikveh. The set is his jail cell, which is rotated (without much real point, in my opinion) by four women, who comment on his explanation of his actions. They outline their stories, and, while they are supposed to be composites of his victims, there is a lot that seems identifiable to anybody who followed the media coverage. That’s a concern, since the playwright, A. J. Campbell, apparently didn’t talk to any of the victims. A bigger problem with the play is that Matty Griffiths, who played Freundel, didn’t seem to know his lines very well. That was obvious partly due to closed captioning, but also had the effect of throwing off the timing of the women.

Despite those problems, the play was interesting, with a shocking ending. Even more interesting was listening to people discussing it afterwards.

Life: A Comic Opera in Three Short Acts: Neal Learner’s light opera was the highlight of this year’s Fringe for me. Act One dealt with birth, as Joan is screaming in agony and Charles tries to reassure her everything will be fine. They reminisce about their meeting and reflect on how their lives will change. And then the twins show up, in a very cleverly staged way. Act Two has the kids growing up and asserting their personalities. Act Three dealt with death. This doesn’t sound particularly interesting, but it was well-written and well-performed. There were some questionable rhymes here and there, but I can forgive this in what was otherwise a quite charming and enjoyable show. This has been selected for the Fringe Extension, by the way, so you still have a chance to see it. I will definitely look for other works by the writer / composer, Neal Learner, in the future.

Graze Box #29

Jul. 24th, 2017 01:50 pm
fauxklore: (Default)
[personal profile] fauxklore
Cinnamon Pretzel: This consists of pretzels and cinnamon honey almonds and has 120 calories. The pretzels are nothing special, but the almonds are fabulous. Those almonds are something I could easily imagine eating by the bushelful, which is why portion control is a good thing.

Raspberry & Coconut Muffin: This is a mixture of raspberry-infused cranberries, almond slivers, amaretti drops, and coconut flakes. It has 140 calories. As long as you don’t expect it to be very muffin-like, it’s a nice sweet snack. Tasty, without being cloyingly sweet. I do recommend eating the various components together, as the coconut flakes and almond slivers aren’t as interesting as the berries and amaretti drops.

Creamy Ranch Kern Pops: These are half-popped corn kernels with sour cream and onion seasoning. They have 140 calories. They have lots of both crunch and flavor. In particular, I appreciate that the flavoring doesn’t have that artificial dairy feeling that is common in so many ranch-flavored products.

Thai Sweet Chili Dippers: This consists of soy rice crackers with a sweet chili sauce for dipping. It has 80 calories. It’s not bad, but the dipping sauce is too sweet and not hot enough.

Chocolate Pretzel Dipper: This consists of pretzel sticks with a chocolate hazelnut spread to dip them in. It has 140 calories. I get this fairly often and continue to like it a lot. It’s another one of those snacks that makes me appreciate portion control.

Active Nutrient Blend (new): This is a mixture of chopped dates, pumpkin seeds, and walnuts. It has 170 calories. I really liked this, which isn’t surprising because all three ingredients are things I like, though only walnuts are something I normally eat. My one quibble is that it works best if you eat all of the ingredients together, but the walnut pieces are too big to really do that. I’d like this even better if I didn’t run out of walnuts while still having plenty of the other ingredients left.

Vitamin E Defense: This is a mixture of hazelnuts, red-skinned peanuts, raisins, and dried cranberries. It has 190 calories. At some level, this is right along the lines of any trail mix combination. It works well enough, but is not especially interesting.

Chinese Shiitake: This is a mushroom broth, with dried shiitake mushrooms, corn, and rice noodles. It has 100 calories. This is nicely spicy, though the corn adds a bit of sweetness, too. It’s a good sort of thing to eat when you have a meeting that will lead to a late lunch.
darthfangirl: the twelfth doctor (Default)
[personal profile] darthfangirl
I just want to say that I'm really happy about the last person who shows up in this trailer (spoilers, obviously):
https://youtu.be/dNx9bzq1p4g

The State of the Nea

Jul. 23rd, 2017 03:06 pm
neadods: (Default)
[personal profile] neadods
This feels... strange. For so long Livejournal was a huge part of my life and fannish experience, then it all... faded away, really. I'm terrible about reading DW and even more terrible about posting (obviously).

But. I'm here. Hello. It may be time to start talking, because twitter and tumblr suck for actually having any kind of actual dialogue and I, as usual Have Things To Say.

Right now, though, it's just going to be: I aintent dead. I am: still into Doctor Who, Sherlock Holmes and yes, BBC Sherlock. I've recently become a huge devotee of Yuri on Ice. Recently by "since I talked on LJ" I've also become a fan of Welcome to Night Vale. Non-fannish topics will include sewing, knitting, quilting, American politics, cooking, and the eternal quest to unfuck my life.

What brought me out now, specifically? I actually see myself reaching the Zone of Permission. You know - "I can do [fun thing] when I've finished [not fun thing]." Usually that's an uphill run on a swift escalator, but... my god. I can actually see a light at the end of that tunnel. The Not Fun Thing was to unfuck my habitat and for the first time in possibly ever, my bedroom is clean and organized, my paperwork is organized and filed, the usual dumping grounds have been un-dumped.

All I have to do is finish decluttering the library. This is a particular challenge in that the library is where I threw things I didn't know what else to do with, but still, I've made incredible inroads. My goal was to get it all done by the first weekend in August and... I think I'm actually going to do it.

And for those of you who've read year after year of "Sunday 7" and other things, well. It's been multiple years and multiple posting platforms but dang. I think I'm going to make it.
ms_prue: (waving)
[personal profile] ms_prue
I have finally typed up my reading notes: 6 A4 hand-written sheets, because the odds of my getting hands on this book again are slim.

Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
was written during WW2 by Marjorie Barnard and Flora Eldershaw, published in censored form in 1947 and republished uncensored in 1983. I discovered it through The Censor's Library which I read late last year and managed to get a copy of the 1983 uncensored edition through interlibrary loan in June. It's considered a work of science fiction because the authors draw the novel's action through to an imagined conclusion to WW2; they finished the work during the war, submitted it for publication but it didn't hit the shelves until the war was over, so you can guess how apathetically it was received at the time.

The structure of the book is a novel-in-a-novel. 400 years in the future, Knarf reads through his newly-finished novel with his archaeologist friend Ord, and they're so engrossed in the read-through they barely take any notice of the election being held that day, on whether a lay council should have input in public governance in the highly technocratic socialist agrarian civilisation that Australia has become. Knarf's novel begins in 1929 Sydney and traces a family and their community through the Depression and WW2 and the cataclysm that followed. It's a story about the big picture and the little picture, desire and reality, and cause and effect. Many notes in page order under the cut, spoilers one and all.

Read more... )

Shall We Pitch? La La La

Jul. 21st, 2017 02:41 pm
fauxklore: (Default)
[personal profile] fauxklore
The King and I: I went with a friend to see The King and I at the Kennedy Center on Wednesday night. This is (like most Rodgers and Hammerstein) a musical I have mixed feelings about. There is some glorious music, e.g. "We Kiss in a Shadow." And, of course, "Shall We Dance?" is a nice showy number. But is "The March of Siamese Children" anything more than a way to show off kids so parents will go to the theatre? Louis (Anna’s son) could use a lot more development as a character. And "I Whistle a Happy Tune" simply annoys me, aside from its earworm potential.

Despite those inherent flaws, the production was quite good, with special kudos to Jose Llana as the King of Siam. I also thought Manna Nichols was very good as Tuptim. The choreography made good use of a relatively small space (this was in the Opera House, not the Eisenhower, which also has the disadvantage of less than wonderful acoustics). Could one write a musical nowadays with an internal ballet like "The Small House of Uncle Thomas?"

My only real complaint (aside from my overall lukewarmness towards the score) is that the show was awfully long. I was nervous about the metro schedule, since trains stop running at 11:30 on weeknights now. I may have to limit weeknight excursions to things that are driveable or that I know will end by 10ish.

Chinotto: We had dinner before the show at Campono, which has okay food and is right across the street from the Kennedy Center. The café in the Kennedy Center is dreadful, with mediocre food and high prices. And the friend I went with was driving, so didn’t want to do dinner in Foggy Bottom beforehand. My salad was fine, but the real reason I am mentioning this is that they have chinotto! I know I am the only North American who actually likes those bitter Italian drinks, but the point is that I do like them and they are hard to find here. So it was a rare treat.

Now, if I could only find somewhere that has Schweppes bitter lemon…

Fielding Dreams: I shouldn’t really go out two nights in a row, but the DC JCC had a program on Washington’s Jewish Ballplayers and, given my minor obsession with Jews in baseball, how could I resist? Fred Frommer (who authored a book on Washington baseball, not limited to Jewish players) moderated the event. The other speakers were Phil Hochberg who, in addition to a career in sports law, was an announcer at RFK Stadium, and Aviva Kempner, who is well known for her documentaries, including The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg. The big news is that she is now working on a documentary about Moe Greenberg and she talked extensively about him.

Anyway, there were 18 Jews who played major league baseball in Washington, though some played only 1 or 2 games. The number should really be 17 because Buddy Myer, despite being in nearly every Jewish Sports Hall of Fame, was not actually Jewish. Most of the players talked about were active in the 1930’s or so, but there were a few I remembered. For example, Greg Goossen played for the Mets for a while, though, of course, their real Jewish star was Art Shamsky. (As far as I know, Ed Kranepool is not Jewish, though he did give a talk at our shul when I was a kid.) It was Goossen about whom Casey Stengel allegedly said "I have a 19 year old player. In 10 years, he has a chance to be 29."

Another familiar player was Jason Marquis, who I saw pitch here several times. The only Jewish pitcher who had a winning career in Washington, however, was Al Schacht, who went 14-10 in the early 1920’s. The other really significant pitcher who was discussed was Syd Cohen, who gave up Babe Ruth’s final home run. But the better story about him is that he played winter ball in Mexico under the name Pablo Garcia. The minor league ballpark in El Paso (where he grew up) is named after him – and his brother, Andy, who was the more successful ballplayer.

The big story, however, was Moe Berg. His baseball career wasn’t exactly impressive, but his career in the OSS made up for it. Apparently, he spoke at least 7 languages – and couldn’t hit in any of them. But his linguistic skills got him sent to Japan with much bigger names and to Switzerland to meet Heisenberg and so on. He was a genuine character and I’m looking forward to Aviva’s movie.

Speaking of Baseball: Jackie Bradley made an awesome catch Sunday night, robbing Aaron Judge of a home run. That is exactly how I like to see my Red Sox deal with the Source of All Evil in the Universe.

Don’t Analyze This Dream: I had, for some reason, been given an opportunity to do another Zero-G flight, for free this time. But there was a lot of paperwork to fill out – enough for a 100+ page book. I got hung up on a question asking me to check off which conditions I had, which including being blind, blonde, or blinde.

fic (time lords not having sex)

Jul. 20th, 2017 12:09 am
nostalgia: (twissy touchy)
[personal profile] nostalgia
Twelve/Missy fic in which they try not to get jiggy with it.

It's almost entirely about sex. Twelve is frustrated, Bill is clever, Missy is an appalling person who keeps getting cockblocked.

(no subject)

Jul. 19th, 2017 10:04 am
nostalgia: (13 DOCTOR WHO IS A WOMAN)
[personal profile] nostalgia
its been a few days now and afaik dr who is still a woman

(no subject)

Jul. 18th, 2017 08:14 am
phosfate: (knifecrab)
[personal profile] phosfate
"The rain was warm and dribbling, as though millions of incontinent hamsters had been suspended over the city."

--Chandland Raymer
Rodent Dick (1943)

13's important thoughts

Jul. 18th, 2017 08:15 am
nostalgia: (13 - eye)
[personal profile] nostalgia
"shit i used to stick my dick in the tardis to make it go what will i do now?"

"my wife is bisexual i'm so glad i planned ahead on that one"

"captain jack is bisexual shit i'm still not free from his flirting"

"clara was bisexual but i can't remember what she looked like so never mind"

"why the fuck do none of these trousers have pockets in them?"

"dicks are literally magic how will i defeat aliens now?"

"missy will be so proud of me"

"maybe i can finally join the sisterhood of karn"
lizbee: (Default)
[personal profile] lizbee
I've been sick as a dog for almost a week -- I haven't had a voice since Saturday morning -- so I was "lucky" enough to have coughed myself awake just in time to catch the announcement live via Twitter.

I've really been hoping for a woman of colour as the next Doctor, and I didn't recognise Jodie Whittaker by name, so I felt a weird stab of disappointment and even betrayal when I saw her white hand, coupled with simultaneous excitement that it was clearly a woman's hand.

I still think that a white woman was the easy option, casting-wise, but I've seen Whittaker in a few things -- including the first four episodes of Broadchurch, which I inhaled last night and enjoyed so much I completely forgot about Game of Thrones -- and she's very, very good.

And I also wonder if it would be unfair to an actress of colour, to throw her to the same wolves that drove Leslie Jones off Twitter, while also expecting her to lead a show with (so far) all-white writers. Which is not to excuse the implications of casting a white woman, I just think it might be complicated. Most things are. Whitakker's already been hit with a barrage of misogyny, and I hope the BBC is filtering her mail.

Anyway, I've curated my social media so well that I haven't seen a single friend or acquaintance saying they're opposed to a female Doctor as such.

On the other hand, I've seen a lot of performative finger-wagging, reminding us that this is only a victory for white women (got it, thanks) and that we can't rely on pop culture to save the world (no, really? Good heavens, I had no idea, thank goodness I had you, random Twitter person, to tell us off for being invested in a hobby!).

I guess I'm weary of performative wokeness, and, while everyone's entitled to an opinion, I find a lot of opinions on Doctor Who from people who aren't or haven't been in the fandom ... lack context? Which is sometimes valuable, and sometimes it's just the hot take equivalent of "DID YOU KNOW THAT 'TORCHWOOD' IS AN ANAGRAM OF 'DOCTOR WHO'?"

ANYWAY. Whitakker. I'm looking forward to her run, I'm still holding out hope for Alexander Siddig or Sophie Okonedo as Fourteen (it's never too soon!), people are already complaining that Whitakker is too young and too old, so, like women everywhere, we already know she just can't win.

Mostly Hotels and Theatre-Going

Jul. 17th, 2017 04:47 pm
fauxklore: (Default)
[personal profile] fauxklore
Celebrity Death Watch: Ilya Glazunov was a Russian painter. Liu Xiaobo was a Chinese writer and dissident. More significantly, he was on my ghoul pool list, since I saw a newspaper article that said his organs were failing in time to use him for my one-time trade. (Tommy Tune should now live until next year.) Fresh Kid Ice was a rapper. Mahi Beamer was a Hawaiian singer. George Romero was a director, best known for the movie Night of the Living Dead. Martin Landau was an actor, notable for starring in Mission: Impossible.

I want to especially highlight Maryam Mirzakhani. She was the first woman to win the Fields Medal, which is the top honor for a mathematician. I will refrain from commenting on the spelling of her first name.

What I Left Out of the NPL Con Write-up: I completely forgot to include my appreciation for all the hard work that Hathor and B-side did as Con hosts. Mea maxima culpa.

The Hotel Rant: I spend a lot of time at hotels. Therefore, I feel qualified to state that most hotels suck. I have already mentioned slow elevators. But there are many many many ways that hotels can make my life miserable.

My chief complaint is hotels that hide their light switches. This was one of the sins of the Hotel Revere, where the NPL con was. There was one dim light near the door, which was not adequate for finding the black on black switches that turned on both the desk lamp and the lamp between the two beds. The latter was especially annoying as there was a switch nearby that did not, so far as I could tell, control anything. At least there was a nearly adequate amount of light once I located those switches. There is one hotel I used to sometimes stay at on business trips (The Boulder Broker) where I learned to pack my own light bulbs, since there wasn’t anything brighter than 25 watts within their guest rooms.

Next on the list is the near impossibility of getting mattresses and pillows right. Most hotel mattresses are too soft. Except for the ones that appear to have been hewn out of granite. It is one thing to have had a super-hard surface when I stayed at the Ice Hotel in Quebec. And, actually, that had several layers of reindeer skins, which made it softer than the mattress at a particularly dreadful hotel in Benin that I have mercifully forgotten the name of. Pillows are even more of a problem, as there are usually too many of them and no good place to leave the extra 20 or so they pile on the bed. The worst offenders in this category are bolsters. I have never met a person who actually uses those bolsters. All hotel managers and designers need to read "The Princess and the Pea" and/or watch the musical, Once Upon a Mattress. Or at least try to sleep in the beds at their hotels.

Speaking of useless things on beds, I have never understood those ridiculous shawl-like pieces of fabrics hotels like to drape across the foot of the bed.

Drapes are often a problem. I tend to bring some duct tape so I can get them to close all the way and blot out light. I have probably ranted before on the subject of hotels that locate their drapes in places that require you to climb over or rearrange furniture in order to close them.

Sound is an even more annoying thing than light. I will note that the Hotel Revere had good sound-proofing. But many hotels do not. I particularly despise atrium hotels, i.e. ones where the rooms are arranged around a tall, sound-reflecting open area. This is an especially common design for Hyatts, which is a reason why I usually prefer Marriotts if I am going to stay at chain hotels.

Bathrooms pose a number of issues. If there is going to be a tub, it should be deep enough to soak in. Bonus points if the hotel provides bath salts or bubble bath. But a shower alone is acceptable, as long as: a) you don’t have to spend a half hour figuring out how the fuck to turn it on and adjust the temperature, b) the shower head is not so far away from where a person would stand to allow the shower water to cool too much by the time it reaches the body, and c) there is some sort of closure that prevents the shower from flooding the entire bathroom when it is used. (I am speaking to every hotel in France here.) Good things include heated floors (ah, Norway) and heated towel racks. However, hot water remains more important. I think it was Ulan Ude where I first encountered the notion that a hotel might have heated towel racks without having hot water, but I’ve run into it once or twice since. And I hope never to have that happen again.

I am not particularly fussy with respect to toiletries, with the proviso that they shouldn’t smell weird. I prefer individual bottles rather than the current eco-trend of large squeezy bottles that: a) you can’t take home with you and b) I don’t trust not to be contaminated with something disgusting. If worst comes to worst, my standard toiletries bag includes a small bottle of Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soap, which is also useable as shampoo, laundry detergent, and reading material.

Finally, there is temperature control. It goes without saying that the thermostat should be easily visible when you enter the room and should not require rearranging furniture to reach. The thermostat should be digital and it should be possible to set the controls for either Fahrenheit (i.e. real temperature) or Celsius. The thermostat should be easily visible and not require an advanced degree in engineering to operate. Come to think of it, I have an advanced degree in engineering and half the time I can’t figure out how to get the bloody temperature to something I can tolerate. (Admittedly, I have about a 1.5 degree comfort range.) The default temperature setting should not be 90F in winter and 60F in summer. If I ruled the world, it would be 76F everywhere all the time.

Hotels that don’t suck include half the hotels in Italy (though the other half are amongst the noisiest places on the planet, so one must seek expert advice) and exactly two hotels in New York (The Algonquin and The Library Hotel). The former is bookable using Marriott points. But one needn’t spend a fortune to stay at one of the rare tolerable hotels in the world. The Albergo Atlantic in Bologna can be had for under 60 bucks a night, including breakfast.

Mr. Taken: The first show I saw at this year’s Capital Fringe was Mr. Taken. Ward Kay, who wrote it, is a Style Invitational devotee. And Valerie Holt, daughter of Empress Pat Myers, was part of the six person cast. The story involves a group of friends and their relationships. At the beginning, Jen is living with Marcus, though they don’t treat each other very well. Eric and Liz have just gotten engaged. And then there is Patty, who is crazy about a guy who has a girlfriend (hence, nicknamed "Mr. Taken") but who Jen is sort of trying to fix up with nerdy Charles. Marcus confronts Jen about her behavior, in front of the others (at a pre-Christmas get-together) and then moves out. Some months later, Patty has spent the night with Eric, whose engagement ended because Liz slept with someone else, when Liz suddenly walks in... All of the performances were good, especially those of Jamel Lewis as Charles, Brooke Bangston as Patty, and, of course, Valerie as Liz. But the show didn’t completely work for me. I had a hard time figuring out why these people were even friends in the first place, never mind sleeping together in various combinations. Then again, this is mostly farce, which is a form of theatre I don’t much care for.

The Originalist: On Saturday, I went to see The Originalist at Arena Stage. This is a play about Antonin Scalia, who was very convincingly played by Edward Gero. His foil throughout is a young African-American lesbian law clerk, Cat, played by Jade Wheeler. There is another clerk, Brad (played by Brett Mack) helping out, but he’s mostly there as sort of the anti-Cat and plays a much smaller role. Why does a flaming liberal want to clerk for a justice like Scalia? Well, she explains, she needs to understand monsters to know how to fight them. Scalia is only partly monstrous in this. He is capable of learning some things from Cat, as well as influencing her. At any rate, I thought this was an excellent play. It was often genuinely funny, while carrying a serious message about whether it is even possible to find a political middle. That’s a question I find even more relevant now than when this play was first produced in 2015. (And, remember, I am a charter member of the Dead Armadillo Party.) I also thought that the use of music – mostly opera excerpts – to delineate scenes was very effective. Overall, I highly recommend seeing this. If one could, it would be ideal to see the evening performance on 22 July, when Ruth Bader Ginsburg is going to be doing the talkback (along with Arena’s artistic director, Molly Smith.)

fic (shut your mouth)

Jul. 17th, 2017 08:13 pm
nostalgia: (bill takes a selfie)
[personal profile] nostalgia
MOAR FIC. It is about Twelve and Bill and Thirteen even though she is not actually in it, and it goes a bit serious in the middle but don't worry that doesn't last.

pls reassure me that i'm not wrong for writing this shit, thnx.
nostalgia: (doctor/river tardis)
[personal profile] nostalgia
I accidentally fic.

Eleven and Thirteen and River. Rated "Teen" for idk suggestiveness and dick jokes probabably?

fic BABY'S FIRST 13 FIC

Jul. 17th, 2017 09:29 am
nostalgia: (13 - eye)
[personal profile] nostalgia
GUYS GUYS GUYS I WROTE THIS it is Bill & Thirteen buying stuff in Superdrug. It's a bit pointless but obviously you have to read it anyway.

A TARDIS Full of Bras

The fic DW looks better

Jul. 16th, 2017 05:43 pm
gritsinmisery: Dancing Baby Groot! (My Mucha)
[personal profile] gritsinmisery
I fixed the broken header and background images in [personal profile] grittyfic . Don't know that I'll be bothered to do so in [personal profile] grittyicons , since it won't make much difference unless I go find and upload all the images I published, too.
 
Fucking Photobucket.

this icon has never been more apt

Jul. 16th, 2017 06:54 pm
nostalgia: (yay tits!)
[personal profile] nostalgia
just to check, im not dreaming am i?

(no subject)

Jul. 16th, 2017 05:50 pm
nostalgia: (bill takes a selfie)
[personal profile] nostalgia
i dont think i've ever seen my flist and my tumblr dash so happy

(no subject)

Jul. 16th, 2017 05:21 pm
nostalgia: (Default)
[personal profile] nostalgia
okay how can i learn to write femslash well in time for thirteen happening on telly?

(no subject)

Jul. 16th, 2017 04:58 pm
nostalgia: (missy!)
[personal profile] nostalgia
YES THIS IS GOOD YES

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